Hunters say that if someone new wants to begin hunting, they will take them out to get a turkey. While a human might have sympathetic notions about a rabbit or a deer, no one ever cried about killing a turkey.

That may explain why 14 eco-terrorists who invaded a farm, cost the lives of over 1,400 turkeys, and were charged with aggravated robbery, obstruction, violation of home or property degradation got away with no jail time at all. The prosecutor had requested from six months to two years jail time for the crime Boucherie abolition clearly committed but the judge instead gave them short suspended sentences.

The activists invaded farms in Beaulieu (Orne), Goussainville (Eure-et-Loir) and Jumelles (Eure) in December 2018 and April 2019 and December 2018 to "free" poultry and pigs, but they don't know anything about either so they instead caused a stampede and the 1,400 turkeys were instead dead, suffocated or trampled.

The prosecution says this is a victory (they will have to pay damages) because they were convicted and got prison sentences, even if they were suspended.

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